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FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS AND GRAINS KOSHER


Fruits, vegetables and grains are basically always kosher, but they must be insect free.
Wine or grape juice, however, must be certified kosher. (Because wine was used in the sacred service in the Holy Temple -- and because it can be defiled through its use in pagan rites -- Torah law requires that only wine produced by Torah-observant Jews be used.)

NUTS- As a general rule, raw nuts do not require certification. Oil roasted, dry roasted and seasoned nuts, in or out of the shell, require reliable certification. There nuts are often treated with gelatin or oils during processing. Roasted peanuts still in shells are acceptable without certification.

Fresh fruits, vegetables and grains -  Are, in their natural unprocessed state, kosher and pareve. They do not need kashrut certification and can be used with either dairy or meat. However, once a vegetable is combined with a dairy or meat product, it becomes dairy or meat respectively.

Processed vegetables such as those canned or frozen may pose a problem. They are sometimes creamed and may contain non­kosher, dairy or meat ingredients; or they may have been processed in vessels used for meat, dairy, or even non-kosher products.

Vegetables- A more common problem with vegetables involves possible insect infestation. The prohibition against consuming insects, even very tiny ones -- as long as they are visible to the naked eye -- is mentioned five times in the Torah and is very strict. In recent years, due to federal regulations restricting insecticide spraying and genetic changes causing some insects to become more resistant to the insecticides, there are increasing amounts of insects such as thrips and aphids infesting some vegetables, especially green and leafy varieties. Although quite small, they are visible to the naked eye and must be removed. Aphids range in size from 2 -5 millimeters (1/16 - 1/8 of an inch).

Many vegetables, fruits, nuts, and grains must be checked before cooking or eating for the presence of small insects. Some particularly severe problem vegetables are artichokes, asparagus, brussel sprouts, cauliflower, and leafy vegetables.

The method of checking depends on the vegetables. Leafy vegetables such as cabbage and lettuce should be checked leaf by leaf. Washing under running water or soaking in salt water is helpful, but the vegetables must also be inspected under a bright light, either daylight or artificial light.
Certain vegetables, such as celery and zucchini may be used after they are washed under running water and scrubbed with a vegetable brush.
The degree to which insects are present varies according to the region, season, and origin of the produce. If it is known that a certain variety is infested, either avoid it for that season or examine it very carefully to remove all insects.
Corn on the cob only requires a visual check for insects.

If you want deep informations about  each vegetal bug checking, click here.

FLOUR - Does not require checking unless there is some reason to suspect infestation such as improper or prolonged storage or movement is noticed (if you live in tropical countries checking is necessary).
If one insect is found, remove it. If two insects are found, a cursory check of the entire container or bag is recommended. If three insects are found, the entire container or bag must be carefully sifted.
Signs of insect infestation include webbing and tunneling.

RICE -
Does not require checking unless there is some reason to suspect infestation such as improper or prolonged storage or movement is noticed.
If one insect is found, remove it. If two insects are found, a cursory check of the entire container or bag is recommended. If three insects are found the entire container or bag must be carefully checked.

HONEY - pure honey is kosher, check if it is really 100% honey